git-branch

       git branch [--color[=<when>] | --no-color] [-r | -a]
               [--list] [-v [--abbrev=<length> | --no-abbrev]]
               [--column[=<options>] | --no-column]
               [(--merged | --no-merged | --contains) [<commit>]] [--sort=<key>]
               [--points-at <object>] [<pattern>...]
       git branch [--set-upstream | --track | --no-track] [-l] [-f] <branchname> [<start-point>]
       git branch (--set-upstream-to=<upstream> | -u <upstream>) [<branchname>]
       git branch --unset-upstream [<branchname>]
       git branch (-m | -M) [<oldbranch>] <newbranch>
       git branch (-d | -D) [-r] <branchname>...
       git branch --edit-description [<branchname>]

DESCRIPTION
       If --list is given, or if there are no non-option arguments, existing
       branches are listed; the current branch will be highlighted with an
       asterisk. Option -r causes the remote-tracking branches to be listed,
       and option -a shows both local and remote branches. If a <pattern> is
       given, it is used as a shell wildcard to restrict the output to
       matching branches. If multiple patterns are given, a branch is shown if
       it matches any of the patterns. Note that when providing a <pattern>,
       you must use --list; otherwise the command is interpreted as branch
       creation.

       With --contains, shows only the branches that contain the named commit
       (in other words, the branches whose tip commits are descendants of the
       named commit). With --merged, only branches merged into the named
       commit (i.e. the branches whose tip commits are reachable from the
       named commit) will be listed. With --no-merged only branches not merged
       into the named commit will be listed. If the <commit> argument is
       missing it defaults to HEAD (i.e. the tip of the current branch).

       The command's second form creates a new branch head named <branchname>
       which points to the current HEAD, or <start-point> if given.

       Note that this will create the new branch, but it will not switch the
       working tree to it; use "git checkout <newbranch>" to switch to the new
       branch.

       When a local branch is started off a remote-tracking branch, Git sets
       up the branch (specifically the branch.<name>.remote and
       branch.<name>.merge configuration entries) so that git pull will
       appropriately merge from the remote-tracking branch. This behavior may
       be changed via the global branch.autoSetupMerge configuration flag.
       That setting can be overridden by using the --track and --no-track
       options, and changed later using git branch --set-upstream-to.

       With a -m or -M option, <oldbranch> will be renamed to <newbranch>. If
       <oldbranch> had a corresponding reflog, it is renamed to match
       <newbranch>, and a reflog entry is created to remember the branch
       renaming. If <newbranch> exists, -M must be used to force the rename to
       happen.

       With a -d or -D option, <branchname> will be deleted. You may specify
       more than one branch for deletion. If the branch currently has a reflog
           --set-upstream.

       -D
           Shortcut for --delete --force.

       -l, --create-reflog
           Create the branch's reflog. This activates recording of all changes
           made to the branch ref, enabling use of date based sha1 expressions
           such as "<branchname>@{yesterday}". Note that in non-bare
           repositories, reflogs are usually enabled by default by the
           core.logallrefupdates config option.

       -f, --force
           Reset <branchname> to <startpoint> if <branchname> exists already.
           Without -f git branch refuses to change an existing branch. In
           combination with -d (or --delete), allow deleting the branch
           irrespective of its merged status. In combination with -m (or
           --move), allow renaming the branch even if the new branch name
           already exists.

       -m, --move
           Move/rename a branch and the corresponding reflog.

       -M
           Shortcut for --move --force.

       --color[=<when>]
           Color branches to highlight current, local, and remote-tracking
           branches. The value must be always (the default), never, or auto.

       --no-color
           Turn off branch colors, even when the configuration file gives the
           default to color output. Same as --color=never.

       --column[=<options>], --no-column
           Display branch listing in columns. See configuration variable
           column.branch for option syntax.--column and --no-column without
           options are equivalent to always and never respectively.

           This option is only applicable in non-verbose mode.

       -r, --remotes
           List or delete (if used with -d) the remote-tracking branches.

       -a, --all
           List both remote-tracking branches and local branches.

       --list
           Activate the list mode.  git branch <pattern> would try to create a
           branch, use git branch --list <pattern> to list matching branches.

       -v, -vv, --verbose
           When in list mode, show sha1 and commit subject line for each head,
           along with relationship to upstream branch (if any). If given

       --no-abbrev
           Display the full sha1s in the output listing rather than
           abbreviating them.

       -t, --track
           When creating a new branch, set up branch.<name>.remote and
           branch.<name>.merge configuration entries to mark the start-point
           branch as "upstream" from the new branch. This configuration will
           tell git to show the relationship between the two branches in git
           status and git branch -v. Furthermore, it directs git pull without
           arguments to pull from the upstream when the new branch is checked
           out.

           This behavior is the default when the start point is a
           remote-tracking branch. Set the branch.autoSetupMerge configuration
           variable to false if you want git checkout and git branch to always
           behave as if --no-track were given. Set it to always if you want
           this behavior when the start-point is either a local or
           remote-tracking branch.

       --no-track
           Do not set up "upstream" configuration, even if the
           branch.autoSetupMerge configuration variable is true.

       --set-upstream
           If specified branch does not exist yet or if --force has been
           given, acts exactly like --track. Otherwise sets up configuration
           like --track would when creating the branch, except that where
           branch points to is not changed.

       -u <upstream>, --set-upstream-to=<upstream>
           Set up <branchname>'s tracking information so <upstream> is
           considered <branchname>'s upstream branch. If no <branchname> is
           specified, then it defaults to the current branch.

       --unset-upstream
           Remove the upstream information for <branchname>. If no branch is
           specified it defaults to the current branch.

       --edit-description
           Open an editor and edit the text to explain what the branch is for,
           to be used by various other commands (e.g.  format-patch,
           request-pull, and merge (if enabled)). Multi-line explanations may
           be used.

       --contains [<commit>]
           Only list branches which contain the specified commit (HEAD if not
           specified). Implies --list.

       --merged [<commit>]
           Only list branches whose tips are reachable from the specified
           commit (HEAD if not specified). Implies --list.

       --no-merged [<commit>]

       <oldbranch>
           The name of an existing branch to rename.

       <newbranch>
           The new name for an existing branch. The same restrictions as for
           <branchname> apply.

       --sort=<key>
           Sort based on the key given. Prefix - to sort in descending order
           of the value. You may use the --sort=<key> option multiple times,
           in which case the last key becomes the primary key. The keys
           supported are the same as those in git for-each-ref. Sort order
           defaults to sorting based on the full refname (including refs/...
           prefix). This lists detached HEAD (if present) first, then local
           branches and finally remote-tracking branches.

       --points-at <object>
           Only list branches of the given object.

EXAMPLES
       Start development from a known tag

               $ git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/.../linux-2.6 my2.6
               $ cd my2.6
               $ git branch my2.6.14 v2.6.14   (1)
               $ git checkout my2.6.14

           1. This step and the next one could be combined into a single step
           with "checkout -b my2.6.14 v2.6.14".

       Delete an unneeded branch

               $ git clone git://git.kernel.org/.../git.git my.git
               $ cd my.git
               $ git branch -d -r origin/todo origin/html origin/man   (1)
               $ git branch -D test                                    (2)

           1. Delete the remote-tracking branches "todo", "html" and "man".
           The next fetch or pull will create them again unless you configure
           them not to. See git-fetch(1).
           2. Delete the "test" branch even if the "master" branch (or
           whichever branch is currently checked out) does not have all
           commits from the test branch.

NOTES
       If you are creating a branch that you want to checkout immediately, it
       is easier to use the git checkout command with its -b option to create
       a branch and check it out with a single command.

       The options --contains, --merged and --no-merged serve three related
       but different purposes:

       o   --contains <commit> is used to find all branches which will need
       history: What is a branch?"[1] in the Git User's Manual.

GIT
       Part of the git(1) suite

NOTES
        1. "Understanding history: What is a branch?"
           file:///usr/share/doc/git/html/user-manual.html#what-is-a-branch

Git 2.7.4                         12/09/2019                     GIT-BRANCH(1)
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