mysqlpump

       mysqlpump [options] [db_name [tbl_name ...]]

DESCRIPTION
       o   mysqlpump Invocation Syntax

       o   mysqlpump Option Summary

       o   mysqlpump Option Descriptions

       o   mysqlpump Object Selection

       o   mysqlpump Parallel Processing

       o   mysqlpump Restrictions

       The mysqlpump client utility performs logical backups, producing a set
       of SQL statements that can be executed to reproduce the original
       database object definitions and table data. It dumps one or more MySQL
       databases for backup or transfer to another SQL server.

       mysqlpump features include:

       o   Parallel processing of databases, and of objects within databases,
           to speed up the dump process

       o   Better control over which databases and database objects (tables,
           stored programs, user accounts) to dump

       o   Dumping of user accounts as account-management statements (CREATE
           USER, GRANT) rather than as inserts into the mysql system database

       o   Capability of creating compressed output

       o   Progress indicator (the values are estimates)

       o   For dump file reloading, faster secondary index creation for InnoDB
           tables by adding indexes after rows are inserted

       mysqlpump requires at least the SELECT privilege for dumped tables,
       SHOW VIEW for dumped views, TRIGGER for dumped triggers, and LOCK
       TABLES if the --single-transaction option is not used. The SELECT
       privilege on the mysql system database is required to dump user
       definitions. Certain options might require other privileges as noted in
       the option descriptions.

       To reload a dump file, you must have the privileges required to execute
       the statements that it contains, such as the appropriate CREATE
       privileges for objects created by those statements.

           Note
           A dump made using PowerShell on Windows with output redirection
           creates a file that has UTF-16 encoding:

               shell> mysqlpump [options] > dump.sql

       To dump a single database, or certain tables within that database, name
       the database on the command line, optionally followed by table names:

           shell> mysqlpump db_name
           shell> mysqlpump db_name tbl_name1 tbl_name2 ...

       To treat all name arguments as database names, use the --databases
       option:

           shell> mysqlpump --databases db_name1 db_name2 ...

       By default, mysqlpump does not dump user account definitions, even if
       you dump the mysql system database that contains the grant tables. To
       dump grant table contents as logical definitions in the form of CREATE
       USER and GRANT statements, use the --users option and suppress all
       database dumping:

           shell> mysqlpump --exclude-databases=% --users

       In the preceding command, % is a wildcard that matches all database
       names for the --exclude-databases option.

       mysqlpump supports several options for including or excluding
       databases, tables, stored programs, and user definitions. See mysqlpump
       Object Selection.

       To reload a dump file, execute the statements that it contains. For
       example, use the mysql client:

           shell> mysqlpump [options] > dump.sql
           shell> mysql < dump.sql

       The following discussion provides additional mysqlpump usage examples.

       To see a list of the options mysqlpump supports, issue the command
       mysqlpump --help.  mysqlpump Option Summary.PP mysqlpump supports the
       following options, which can be specified on the command line or in the
       [mysqlpump] and [client] groups of an option file. For information
       about option files used by MySQL programs, see Section 4.2.6, "Using
       Option Files".  mysqlpump Option Descriptions

       o   --help, -?

           Display a help message and exit.

       o   --add-drop-database

           Write a DROP DATABASE statement before each CREATE DATABASE
           statement.

       o   --add-drop-table

           Write a DROP TABLE statement before each CREATE TABLE statement.
           statements from different tables can be interleaved and UNLOCK
           TABLES following the end of the inserts for one table could release
           locks on tables for which inserts remain.

           --add-locks and --single-transaction are mutually exclusive.

       o   --all-databases, -A

           Dump all databases (with certain exceptions noted in mysqlpump
           Restrictions). This is the default behavior if no other is
           specified explicitly.

           --all-databases and --databases are mutually exclusive.

       o   --bind-address=ip_address

           On a computer having multiple network interfaces, use this option
           to select which interface to use for connecting to the MySQL
           server.

       o   --character-sets-dir=path

           The directory where character sets are installed. See
           Section 10.14, "Character Set Configuration".

       o   --complete-insert

           Write complete INSERT statements that include column names.

       o   --compress, -C

           Compress all information sent between the client and the server if
           both support compression.

       o   --compress-output=algorithm

           By default, mysqlpump does not compress output. This option
           specifies output compression using the specified algorithm.
           Permitted algorithms are LZ4 and ZLIB.

           To uncompress compressed output, you must have an appropriate
           utility. If the system commands lz4 and openssl zlib are not
           available, as of MySQL 5.7.10, MySQL distributions include
           lz4_decompress and zlib_decompress utilities that can be used to
           decompress mysqlpump output that was compressed using the
           --compress-output=LZ4 and --compress-output=ZLIB options. For more
           information, see lz4_decompress(1), and zlib_decompress(1).

           Alternatives include the lz4 and openssl commands, if they are
           installed on your system. For example, lz4 can uncompress LZ4
           output:

               shell> lz4 -d input_file output_file

           --all-databases and --databases are mutually exclusive.

       o   --debug[=debug_options], -# [debug_options]

           Write a debugging log. A typical debug_options string is
           d:t:o,file_name. The default is d:t:O,/tmp/mysqlpump.trace.

       o   --debug-check

           Print some debugging information when the program exits.

       o   --debug-info, -T

           Print debugging information and memory and CPU usage statistics
           when the program exits.

       o   --default-auth=plugin

           A hint about the client-side authentication plugin to use. See
           Section 6.2.13, "Pluggable Authentication".

       o   --default-character-set=charset_name

           Use charset_name as the default character set. See Section 10.14,
           "Character Set Configuration". If no character set is specified,
           mysqlpump uses utf8.

       o   --default-parallelism=N

           The default number of threads for each parallel processing queue.
           The default is 2.

           The --parallel-schemas option also affects parallelism and can be
           used to override the default number of threads. For more
           information, see mysqlpump Parallel Processing.

           With --default-parallelism=0 and no --parallel-schemas options,
           mysqlpump runs as a single-threaded process and creates no queues.

           With parallelism enabled, it is possible for output from different
           databases to be interleaved.

               Note
               Before MySQL 5.7.11, use of the --single-transaction option is
               mutually exclusive with parallelism. To use
               --single-transaction, disable parallelism by setting
               --default-parallelism to 0 and not using any instances of
               --parallel-schemas:

                   shell> mysqlpump --single-transaction --default-parallelism=0

       o   --defaults-extra-file=file_name

           Read this option file after the global option file but (on Unix)
           otherwise inaccessible, an error occurs.  file_name is interpreted
           relative to the current directory if given as a relative path name
           rather than a full path name.

           Exception: Even with --defaults-file, client programs read
           .mylogin.cnf.

           For additional information about this and other option-file
           options, see Section 4.2.7, "Command-Line Options that Affect
           Option-File Handling".

       o   --defaults-group-suffix=str

           Read not only the usual option groups, but also groups with the
           usual names and a suffix of str. For example, mysqlpump normally
           reads the [client] and [mysqlpump] groups. If the
           --defaults-group-suffix=_other option is given, mysqlpump also
           reads the [client_other] and [mysqlpump_other] groups.

           For additional information about this and other option-file
           options, see Section 4.2.7, "Command-Line Options that Affect
           Option-File Handling".

       o   --defer-table-indexes

           In the dump output, defer index creation for each table until after
           its rows have been loaded. This works for all storage engines, but
           for InnoDB applies only for secondary indexes.

           This option is enabled by default; use --skip-defer-table-indexes
           to disable it.

       o   --events

           Include Event Scheduler events for the dumped databases in the
           output. Event dumping requires the EVENT privileges for those
           databases.

           The output generated by using --events contains CREATE EVENT
           statements to create the events. However, these statements do not
           include attributes such as the event creation and modification
           timestamps, so when the events are reloaded, they are created with
           timestamps equal to the reload time.

           If you require events to be created with their original timestamp
           attributes, do not use --events. Instead, dump and reload the
           contents of the mysql.event table directly, using a MySQL account
           that has appropriate privileges for the mysql database.

           This option is enabled by default; use --skip-events to disable it.

       o   --exclude-databases=db_list

           Do not dump the databases in db_list, which is a list of one or
           Do not dump the events in routine_list, which is a list of one or
           more comma-separated routine (stored procedure or function) names.
           Multiple instances of this option are additive. For more
           information, see mysqlpump Object Selection.

       o   --exclude-tables=table_list

           Do not dump the tables in table_list, which is a list of one or
           more comma-separated table names. Multiple instances of this option
           are additive. For more information, see mysqlpump Object Selection.

       o   --exclude-triggers=trigger_list

           Do not dump the triggers in trigger_list, which is a list of one or
           more comma-separated trigger names. Multiple instances of this
           option are additive. For more information, see mysqlpump Object
           Selection.

       o   --exclude-users=user_list

           Do not dump the user accounts in user_list, which is a list of one
           or more comma-separated account names. Multiple instances of this
           option are additive. For more information, see mysqlpump Object
           Selection.

       o   --extended-insert=N

           Write INSERT statements using multiple-row syntax that includes
           several VALUES lists. This results in a smaller dump file and
           speeds up inserts when the file is reloaded.

           The option value indicates the number of rows to include in each
           INSERT statement. The default is 250. A value of 1 produces one
           INSERT statement per table row.

       o   --get-server-public-key

           Request from the server the public key required for RSA key
           pair-based password exchange. This option applies to clients that
           that authenticate with the caching_sha2_password authentication
           plugin. For that plugin, the server does not send the public key
           unless requested. This option is ignored for accounts that do not
           authenticate with that plugin. It is also ignored if RSA-based
           password exchange is not used, as is the case when the client
           connects to the server using a secure connection.

           If --server-public-key-path=file_name is given and specifies a
           valid public key file, it takes precedence over
           --get-server-public-key.

           For information about the caching_sha2_password plugin, see
           Section 6.4.1.5, "Caching SHA-2 Pluggable Authentication".

           The --get-server-public-key option was added in MySQL 5.7.23.

           Dump the databases in db_list, which is a list of one or more
           comma-separated database names. The dump includes all objects in
           the named databases. Multiple instances of this option are
           additive. For more information, see mysqlpump Object Selection.

       o   --include-events=event_list

           Dump the events in event_list, which is a list of one or more
           comma-separated event names. Multiple instances of this option are
           additive. For more information, see mysqlpump Object Selection.

       o   --include-routines=routine_list

           Dump the routines in routine_list, which is a list of one or more
           comma-separated routine (stored procedure or function) names.
           Multiple instances of this option are additive. For more
           information, see mysqlpump Object Selection.

       o   --include-tables=table_list

           Dump the tables in table_list, which is a list of one or more
           comma-separated table names. Multiple instances of this option are
           additive. For more information, see mysqlpump Object Selection.

       o   --include-triggers=trigger_list

           Dump the triggers in trigger_list, which is a list of one or more
           comma-separated trigger names. Multiple instances of this option
           are additive. For more information, see mysqlpump Object Selection.

       o   --include-users=user_list

           Dump the user accounts in user_list, which is a list of one or more
           comma-separated user names. Multiple instances of this option are
           additive. For more information, see mysqlpump Object Selection.

       o   --insert-ignore

           Write INSERT IGNORE statements rather than INSERT statements.

       o   --log-error-file=file_name

           Log warnings and errors by appending them to the named file. If
           this option is not given, mysqlpump writes warnings and errors to
           the standard error output.

       o   --login-path=name

           Read options from the named login path in the .mylogin.cnf login
           path file. A "login path" is an option group containing options
           that specify which MySQL server to connect to and which account to
           authenticate as. To create or modify a login path file, use the
           mysql_config_editor utility. See mysql_config_editor(1).
           The initial size of the buffer for client/server communication.
           When creating multiple-row INSERT statements (as with the
           --extended-insert option), mysqlpump creates rows up to N bytes
           long. If you use this option to increase the value, ensure that the
           MySQL server net_buffer_length system variable has a value at least
           this large.

       o   --no-create-db

           Suppress any CREATE DATABASE statements that might otherwise be
           included in the output.

       o   --no-create-info, -t

           Do not write CREATE TABLE statements that create each dumped table.

       o   --no-defaults

           Do not read any option files. If program startup fails due to
           reading unknown options from an option file, --no-defaults can be
           used to prevent them from being read.

           The exception is that the .mylogin.cnf file, if it exists, is read
           in all cases. This permits passwords to be specified in a safer way
           than on the command line even when --no-defaults is used.
           (.mylogin.cnf is created by the mysql_config_editor utility. See
           mysql_config_editor(1).)

           For additional information about this and other option-file
           options, see Section 4.2.7, "Command-Line Options that Affect
           Option-File Handling".

       o   --parallel-schemas=[N:]db_list

           Create a queue for processing the databases in db_list, which is a
           list of one or more comma-separated database names. If N is given,
           the queue uses N threads. If N is not given, the
           --default-parallelism option determines the number of queue
           threads.

           Multiple instances of this option create multiple queues.
           mysqlpump also creates a default queue to use for databases not
           named in any --parallel-schemas option, and for dumping user
           definitions if command options select them. For more information,
           see mysqlpump Parallel Processing.

       o   --password[=password], -p[password]

           The password to use when connecting to the server. If you use the
           short option form (-p), you cannot have a space between the option
           and the password. If you omit the password value following the
           --password or -p option on the command line, mysqlpump prompts for
           one.

       o   --port=port_num, -P port_num

           The TCP/IP port number to use for the connection.

       o   --print-defaults

           Print the program name and all options that it gets from option
           files.

           For additional information about this and other option-file
           options, see Section 4.2.7, "Command-Line Options that Affect
           Option-File Handling".

       o   --protocol={TCP|SOCKET|PIPE|MEMORY}

           The connection protocol to use for connecting to the server. It is
           useful when the other connection parameters normally would cause a
           protocol to be used other than the one you want. For details on the
           permissible values, see Section 4.2.2, "Connecting to the MySQL
           Server".

       o   --replace

           Write REPLACE statements rather than INSERT statements.

       o   --result-file=file_name

           Direct output to the named file. The result file is created and its
           previous contents overwritten, even if an error occurs while
           generating the dump.

           This option should be used on Windows to prevent newline \n
           characters from being converted to \r\n carriage return/newline
           sequences.

       o   --routines

           Include stored routines (procedures and functions) for the dumped
           databases in the output. This option requires the SELECT privilege
           for the mysql.proc table.

           The output generated by using --routines contains CREATE PROCEDURE
           and CREATE FUNCTION statements to create the routines. However,
           these statements do not include attributes such as the routine
           creation and modification timestamps, so when the routines are
           reloaded, they are created with timestamps equal to the reload
           time.

           If you require routines to be created with their original timestamp
           attributes, do not use --routines. Instead, dump and reload the
           contents of the mysql.proc table directly, using a MySQL account
           that has appropriate privileges for the mysql database.

           This option is enabled by default; use --skip-routines to disable

       o   --server-public-key-path=file_name

           The path name to a file containing a client-side copy of the public
           key required by the server for RSA key pair-based password
           exchange. The file must be in PEM format. This option applies to
           clients that authenticate with the sha256_password or
           caching_sha2_password authentication plugin. This option is ignored
           for accounts that do not authenticate with one of those plugins. It
           is also ignored if RSA-based password exchange is not used, as is
           the case when the client connects to the server using a secure
           connection.

           If --server-public-key-path=file_name is given and specifies a
           valid public key file, it takes precedence over
           --get-server-public-key.

           For sha256_password, this option applies only if MySQL was built
           using OpenSSL.

           For information about the sha256_password and caching_sha2_password
           plugins, see Section 6.4.1.4, "SHA-256 Pluggable Authentication",
           and Section 6.4.1.5, "Caching SHA-2 Pluggable Authentication".

           The --server-public-key-path option was added in MySQL 5.7.23.

       o   --set-charset

           Write SET NAMES default_character_set to the output.

           This option is enabled by default. To disable it and suppress the
           SET NAMES statement, use --skip-set-charset.

       o   --set-gtid-purged=value

           This option enables control over global transaction ID (GTID)
           information written to the dump file, by indicating whether to add
           a SET @@GLOBAL.gtid_purged statement to the output. This option may
           also cause a statement to be written to the output that disables
           binary logging while the dump file is being reloaded.

           The following table shows the permitted option values. The default
           value is AUTO.

           +------+----------------------------+
           |Value | Meaning                    |
           +------+----------------------------+
           |OFF   | Add no SET statement to    |
           |      | the output.                |
           +------+----------------------------+
           |ON    | Add a SET statement to the |
           |      | output. An error occurs if |
           |      |                   GTIDs    |
           |      | are not enabled on the     |
           |      | server.                    |
           o   --set-gtid-purged=ON: SET @@SESSION.SQL_LOG_BIN=0; is added to
               the output.

           o   --set-gtid-purged=AUTO: SET @@SESSION.SQL_LOG_BIN=0; is added
               to the output if GTIDs are enabled on the server you are
               backing up (that is, if AUTO evaluates to ON).

           This option was added in MySQL 5.7.18.

       o   --single-transaction

           This option sets the transaction isolation mode to REPEATABLE READ
           and sends a START TRANSACTION SQL statement to the server before
           dumping data. It is useful only with transactional tables such as
           InnoDB, because then it dumps the consistent state of the database
           at the time when START TRANSACTION was issued without blocking any
           applications.

           When using this option, you should keep in mind that only InnoDB
           tables are dumped in a consistent state. For example, any MyISAM or
           MEMORY tables dumped while using this option may still change
           state.

           While a --single-transaction dump is in process, to ensure a valid
           dump file (correct table contents and binary log coordinates), no
           other connection should use the following statements: ALTER TABLE,
           CREATE TABLE, DROP TABLE, RENAME TABLE, TRUNCATE TABLE. A
           consistent read is not isolated from those statements, so use of
           them on a table to be dumped can cause the SELECT that is performed
           by mysqlpump to retrieve the table contents to obtain incorrect
           contents or fail.

           --add-locks and --single-transaction are mutually exclusive.

               Note
               Before MySQL 5.7.11, use of the --single-transaction option is
               mutually exclusive with parallelism. To use
               --single-transaction, disable parallelism by setting
               --default-parallelism to 0 and not using any instances of
               --parallel-schemas:

                   shell> mysqlpump --single-transaction --default-parallelism=0

       o   --skip-definer

           Omit DEFINER and SQL SECURITY clauses from the CREATE statements
           for views and stored programs. The dump file, when reloaded,
           creates objects that use the default DEFINER and SQL SECURITY
           values. See Section 23.6, "Stored Object Access Control".

       o   --skip-dump-rows, -d

           Do not dump table rows.

       o   --tls-version=protocol_list

           The protocols the client permits for encrypted connections. The
           value is a list of one or more comma-separated protocol names. The
           protocols that can be named for this option depend on the SSL
           library used to compile MySQL. For details, see Section 6.3.6,
           "Encrypted Connection Protocols and Ciphers".

           This option was added in MySQL 5.7.10.

       o   --triggers

           Include triggers for each dumped table in the output.

           This option is enabled by default; use --skip-triggers to disable
           it.

       o   --tz-utc

           This option enables TIMESTAMP columns to be dumped and reloaded
           between servers in different time zones.  mysqlpump sets its
           connection time zone to UTC and adds SET TIME_ZONE='+00:00' to the
           dump file. Without this option, TIMESTAMP columns are dumped and
           reloaded in the time zones local to the source and destination
           servers, which can cause the values to change if the servers are in
           different time zones.  --tz-utc also protects against changes due
           to daylight saving time.

           This option is enabled by default; use --skip-tz-utc to disable it.

       o   --user=user_name, -u user_name

           The MySQL user name to use when connecting to the server.

       o   --users

           Dump user accounts as logical definitions in the form of CREATE
           USER and GRANT statements.

           User definitions are stored in the grant tables in the mysql system
           database. By default, mysqlpump does not include the grant tables
           in mysql database dumps. To dump the contents of the grant tables
           as logical definitions, use the --users option and suppress all
           database dumping:

               shell> mysqlpump --exclude-databases=% --users

       o   --version, -V

           Display version information and exit.

       o   --watch-progress

           Periodically display a progress indicator that provides information

       o   --include-tables and --exclude-tables apply to tables. These
           options also affect triggers associated with tables unless the
           trigger-specific options are given.

       o   --include-triggers and --exclude-triggers apply to triggers.

       o   --include-routines and --exclude-routines apply to stored
           procedures and functions. If a routine option matches a stored
           procedure name, it also matches a stored function of the same name.

       o   --include-events and --exclude-events apply to Event Scheduler
           events.

       o   --include-users and --exclude-users apply to user accounts.

       Any inclusion or exclusion option may be given multiple times. The
       effect is additive. Order of these options does not matter.

       The value of each inclusion and exclusion option is a list of
       comma-separated names of the appropriate object type. For example:

           --exclude-databases=test,world
           --include-tables=customer,invoice

       Wildcard characters are permitted in the object names:

       o   % matches any sequence of zero or more characters.

       o   _ matches any single character.

       For example, --include-tables=t%,__tmp matches all table names that
       begin with t and all five-character table names that end with tmp.

       For users, a name specified without a host part is interpreted with an
       implied host of %. For example, u1 and u1@% are equivalent. This is the
       same equivalence that applies in MySQL generally (see Section 6.2.4,
       "Specifying Account Names").

       Inclusion and exclusion options interact as follows:

       o   By default, with no inclusion or exclusion options, mysqlpump dumps
           all databases (with certain exceptions noted in mysqlpump
           Restrictions).

       o   If inclusion options are given in the absence of exclusion options,
           only the objects named as included are dumped.

       o   If exclusion options are given in the absence of inclusion options,
           all objects are dumped except those named as excluded.

       o   If inclusion and exclusion options are given, all objects named as
           excluded and not named as included are not dumped. All other
           objects are dumped.

           specifying no object options at all (the default mysqlpump action
           is to dump everything).

           --include-databases=% is similar to --all-databases, but selects
           all databases for dumping, even those that are exceptions for
           --all-databases.

       o   The --databases option causes mysqlpump to treat all name arguments
           as names of databases to dump. It is equivalent to an
           --include-databases option that names the same databases.
       mysqlpump Parallel Processing.PP mysqlpump can use parallelism to
       achieve concurrent processing. You can select concurrency between
       databases (to dump multiple databases simultaneously) and within
       databases (to dump multiple objects from a given database
       simultaneously).

       By default, mysqlpump sets up one queue with two threads. You can
       create additional queues and control the number of threads assigned to
       each one, including the default queue:

       o   --default-parallelism=N specifies the default number of threads
           used for each queue. In the absence of this option, N is 2.

           The default queue always uses the default number of threads.
           Additional queues use the default number of threads unless you
           specify otherwise.

       o   --parallel-schemas=[N:]db_list sets up a processing queue for
           dumping the databases named in db_list and optionally specifies how
           many threads the queue uses.  db_list is a list of comma-separated
           database names. If the option argument begins with N:, the queue
           uses N threads. Otherwise, the --default-parallelism option
           determines the number of queue threads.

           Multiple instances of the --parallel-schemas option create multiple
           queues.

           Names in the database list are permitted to contain the same % and
           _ wildcard characters supported for filtering options (see
           mysqlpump Object Selection).

       mysqlpump uses the default queue for processing any databases not named
       explicitly with a --parallel-schemas option, and for dumping user
       definitions if command options select them.

       In general, with multiple queues, mysqlpump uses parallelism between
       the sets of databases processed by the queues, to dump multiple
       databases simultaneously. For a queue that uses multiple threads,
       mysqlpump uses parallelism within databases, to dump multiple objects
       from a given database simultaneously. Exceptions can occur; for
       example, mysqlpump may block queues while it obtains from the server
       lists of objects in databases.

       With parallelism enabled, it is possible for output from different
           shell> mysqlpump --parallel-schemas=db1,db2 --parallel-schemas=db3

       mysqlpump sets up a queue to process db1 and db2, another queue to
       process db3, and a default queue to process all other databases. All
       queues use two threads.

           shell> mysqlpump --parallel-schemas=db1,db2 --parallel-schemas=db3
                    --default-parallelism=4

       This is the same as the previous example except that all queues use
       four threads.

           shell> mysqlpump --parallel-schemas=5:db1,db2 --parallel-schemas=3:db3

       The queue for db1 and db2 uses five threads, the queue for db3 uses
       three threads, and the default queue uses the default of two threads.

       As a special case, with --default-parallelism=0 and no
       --parallel-schemas options, mysqlpump runs as a single-threaded process
       and creates no queues.

           Note
           Before MySQL 5.7.11, use of the --single-transaction option is
           mutually exclusive with parallelism. To use --single-transaction,
           disable parallelism by setting --default-parallelism to 0 and not
           using any instances of --parallel-schemas:

               shell> mysqlpump --single-transaction --default-parallelism=0
       mysqlpump Restrictions.PP mysqlpump does not dump the
       INFORMATION_SCHEMA, performance_schema, ndbinfo, or sys schema by
       default. To dump any of these, name them explicitly on the command
       line. You can also name them with the --databases or
       --include-databases option.

       mysqlpump does not dump InnoDB CREATE TABLESPACE statements.

       mysqlpump dumps user accounts in logical form using CREATE USER and
       GRANT statements (for example, when you use the --include-users or
       --users option). For this reason, dumps of the mysql system database do
       not by default include the grant tables that contain user definitions:
       user, db, tables_priv, columns_priv, procs_priv, or proxies_priv. To
       dump any of the grant tables, name the mysql database followed by the
       table names:

           shell> mysqlpump mysql user db ...

COPYRIGHT
       Copyright (C) 1997, 2019, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights
       reserved.

       This documentation is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
       modify it only under the terms of the GNU General Public License as
       published by the Free Software Foundation; version 2 of the License.

       may already be installed locally and which is also available online at
       http://dev.mysql.com/doc/.

AUTHOR
       Oracle Corporation (http://dev.mysql.com/).

MySQL 5.7                         04/12/2019                      MYSQLPUMP(1)
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